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Keeping Rhode Islanders healthy for almost 30 years

Learn about our low or no-cost health plans and The United Healthcare difference. 

 

 

Helping people is at the heart of all we do

You’ll find UnitedHealthcare serving members and communities across Rhode Island. Helping our members get the care they need – and working closely with local groups to help our communities grow even stronger and healthier.

We offer many plans to help Rhode Islanders get healthy. And stay healthy. In addition to our Medicaid plans, our Dual Special Needs Plan is for those who qualify for both Medicaid and Medicare.

Plus, we offer one of the largest provider networks in Rhode Island. This gives you more options to choose the providers and specialists that fit your health care needs.

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Vaccination Guide


Is the Coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccination safe?

  • Learn how the vaccine is safe
  • Schedule an appointment to get a COVID-19 vaccination at $0 cost-share

Is the COVID-19 vaccine safe?

Over 145 million doses of COVID-19 vaccines were administered in the United States from December 14, 2020, through March 29, 2021.

COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective. COVID-19 vaccines were evaluated in tens of thousands of participants in clinical trials. The vaccines met FDA’s rigorous scientific standards for safety, effectiveness, and manufacturing quality needed to support emergency use authorization (EUA). Learn more about EUAs in this video.

Millions of people in the United States have received COVID-19 vaccines, and these vaccines will undergo the most intensive safety monitoring in U.S. history. This monitoring includes using both established and new safety monitoring systems to make sure that COVID-19 vaccines are safe.

Learn more facts about COVID-19 vaccines.


What to expect when you get the vaccine

  • Learn about the 2 doses to the COVID-19 vaccination
  • Understand symptoms after being vaccinated

What should I do if I have a side effect from the COVID-19 vaccine?

As with other vaccines and according to the CDC, people report some side effects with the FDA-authorized COVID-19 vaccines. The side effects may feel like the flu and might even affect your ability to do daily activities. But they should go away in a few days.

In the event of an emergency, you should call 911 or go to the nearest hospital. 

If you have side effects that bother you or do not go away, you should report them to your vaccination provider or primary care provider. You should also let the CDC know by calling 1-800-822-7967 or using the CDC’s v-safe mobile app. This will help you watch for side effects and get second-dose reminders. 

Learn more facts about COVID-19 vaccines. 


Where can I get vaccinated?

  • Find a vaccination center 
  • See if you are eligible and schedule an appointment to get a COVID-19 vaccination at $0 cost-share 

How do I get the COVID-19 vaccine in Rhode Island?

Similar to COVID-19 testing in Rhode Island, there are different ways to get vaccinated in Rhode Island. The three main ways that people can get vaccinated are: State vaccination sites, designated local pharmacies, and other local and regional vaccination sites, like clinics run by cities and towns,  hospitals, community health centers, and other sites in the community. Every vaccination site follows the same population eligibility criteria. However, some will move through their priority populations at different speeds due to population size and operational capacity.

How do I make an appointment to get the COIVD-19 vaccine ?

Please go to covid.ri.gov/vaccination to learn how to get a vaccine at a state-run site, a local pharmacy, or at a local or regional vaccine site. Please note: To get vaccinated in Rhode Island, you must live in Rhode Island, work in Rhode Island, or go to school in Rhode Island.

Learn more facts about COVID-19 vaccines. 

Health Plans and Featured Programs


Medicaid Health Plans

Low or no-cost Medicaid Plans for children and adults. Examples of benefits to keep you and your family covered include:

Provider Visits - As Low as $0 Copay

  • Annual wellness visits 
  • Well-child visits
  • Primary care provider (PCP) visits
  • Specialist visits

Common Services 
As Low as $0 Copay

  • Emergency and urgent care
  • Prescription drugs
  • Hospital services
  • Immunizations

Other Covered Services 
As Low as $0 Copay

  • Mental health and substance use treatment
  • Care management
  • Diabetes supplies
  • Dental services 

As Low as $0 Dual Special Needs Health Plan*

A dual special needs plan (DSNP) is a type of health insurance plan. It’s for people who have both Medicaid and Medicare. If that’s you, you’re “dual-eligible.” 

* Your costs may be as low as $0, depending on your level of Medicaid eligibility.

Prescription Drug Coverage
As low as $0 drug copays on all tiers of covered generic and name-brand prescription medications with option for home delivery

Dental
Up to $3000 for covered dental services such as certain cleanings, fillings, crowns, root canals, extractions and dentures

OTC Items - Debit and Food Allowance
Up to $820 yearly to buy over-the-counter products in-store or for home delivery, plus up to $300 yearly in healthy food at many retailers

Hearing
Routine hearing exam and $2500 allowance toward name-brand hearing aids or UnitedHealthcare Hearing's exclusive brand Relate™

Vision
Routine eye exam and $150 allowance for contacts or frames, with standard (single, bi-focal, tri-focal or standard progressive) lenses covered in full


Healthy First Steps®

Build a healthy future for you and your baby, and earn great rewards. Our UnitedHealthcare Healthy First Steps® program helps keep you and your baby healthy during pregnancy and your baby’s first 15 months of life.

We will help you:

  • Choose a pregnancy provider and a pediatrician (child’s doctor).
  • Schedule visits and exams and arrange rides to your visits.
  • Earn rewards for going to visits throughout your pregnancy and baby’s first 15 months of life.
  • Get supplies, including breast pumps for nursing moms.
  • Connect with community resources such as Women, Infants and Children (WIC) services.

Quit For Life® Program

Tobacco is bad for you. Quitting is good for you. We can help.

Get coaching and online support to help you quit tobacco. It’s one of the best things you can do for your health.

Get assistance deciding which type of nicotine substitute or medication is right for you. All at no cost to you.


Behavioral Health Services

Behavioral health is as important as physical health. That’s why we have coverage for both.

Required care is 100% covered with no co-pay, including testing and diagnosis, behavioral therapy and medication.

Behavioral health services can help you with personal problems that may affect you and/or your family. These problems may be stress, depression, anxiety or using drugs or alcohol. We can help. 

Reading-newsltter

HealthTalk Member Newsletter

Our HealthTalk newsletter is now online. The newsletters are a great way to learn about our health plan and important health topics.

You can read it whenever, wherever you want. Check back quarterly for a new edition.

Senior Focus English | Español | Portuguese

Health Education

woman-power-walking

Healthy weight. Getting exercise.

Losing weight does not have to be hard. 

Getting more exercise is one of the best ways. Try to get 60 minutes or more of exercise every day. It doesn’t have to mean doing hard exercises or going to the gym every day. Just move your body. Here are some ideas:

Move! Dancing to your favorite tunes can help you burn more than 300 calories an hour. 

If you do play video games, play interactive ones where you have to move. You don’t even have to leave the house to move – try exercises like jumping jacks, marching in place, going up and down stairs, push-ups or sit-ups at home.

Walk! Take a walk with a friend outside. Walk your dog or your neighbor’s dog, or walk your cat! Instead of driving, walk or bike to school or a friend’s house.

Clean! Vacuum your room. Wash the car. Mow the lawn. Your parents will be happy, and it’s another chance for you to get more exercise, and maybe even have some fun.

Unplug! Limit your time watching TV or using your smartphone, computer or other device. Keep screen time to less than two hours a day. When you do watch TV or use your phone – try marching in place or exercising while you watch/play.

fruits-vegetables

Healthy weight. Healthy eating.

Healthy Weight. Healthy You.

When you eat more calories than you use, your body stores the extra calories as fat. 

A few extra pounds are not bad for most people, but too many extra pounds and too much body fat can be bad for your health.

Providers use a measurement called body mass index (BMI), using your height and your weight to determine how much body fat you have. The best way to stay at a healthy weight or to lose weight is to make good food choices. Here are some easy ways to do that every day:

  • Try to eat more vegetables and fruit than any other type of food whenever possible.
  • Choose low-calorie foods or smaller portions when eating out.
  • Pick healthy side dishes like apple slices or apple sauce instead of Ffrench fries. If you are really craving fries, try eating something healthy like a salad, apple slices or apple sauce first, then split a small portion of fries with a few other people.
  • Drink water or milk instead of soda.
  • Check the label – can you recognize all of the ingredients? If not, it might have a lot of extra stuff you don’t need, so look for other options. Try nuts or whole grain crackers instead of chips.
  • Try replacing sugary snacks with things like yogurt or dried fruit (without added sugar). If you have a sweet tooth, try a small portion of your favorite sweet only once a day.

Depression

Depression is a real illness. It can be treated.

You can feel like yourself again. Depression is an illness like diabetes or heart disease. The first step is to accept that you need help. The second step is to talk to your provider.

Common signs of depression can include:

• Feeling unhappy, down or sad every day or feeling worthless, guilty, helpless or hopeless. 
• Loss of interest in hobbies, activities and people you once enjoyed.
• Trouble sleeping or sleeping more than usual, or feeling tired, weak or low in energy.
• Loss of appetite or eating too much.
• Having trouble concentrating, remembering or making decisions.
• Thinking or talking about suicide.

Find out more online at liveandworkwell.com.


How stress affects you

When you're stressed, your body knows it. 

Your heart starts pounding and your muscles tense. Everyone has stress in their life now and then. But chronic stress can have negative effects on both your physical and your mental health. 

It can affect:
Digestion. Stress slows the release of stomach acid and causes the colon to work faster. This can result in stomach aches or diarrhea.

Heart rate and blood vessels. Your heart rate, blood pressure and cholesterol may increase. This raises your risk for heart attacks and strokes.

Immune system. Stress makes wounds heal slower. You’re also more likely to get colds and infections.

Weight. Stress makes you crave fats and carbohydrates. If you gain weight in your abdominal area, you’re at greater
risk for heart disease and diabetes.

Mental health. Stress makes you tense and anxious. This can lead to depression, headaches or other problems such as trouble sleeping.

Regain your balance. If stress has taken over your life, here are some ideas to regain control:

Make time for regular exercise. Check with your doctor to see what types of exercise are right for you.

  • Do things you enjoy.
  • Learn how to relax. 
  • Treat yourself well.

If your stress is still an issue, talk with your doctor. He or she can recommend someone who can help you find other ways to manage your stress.

Find out more online at liveandworkwell.com


Depression medication

Questions, answers and helpful advice.

Be sure to see your provider regularly. Especially when you first start taking a depression medicine. Or when the dose is changed.

How do I know my medicine is working?

Be patient. Give it time to work. Most people start to feel better after several weeks. You should feel less tired or worried, little by little. It may take a while to get the full benefits of your medicine.