Welcome to UnitedHealthcare Community Plan in Nebraska

Learn about plan types

Dual Special Needs Plans (DSNP)

Dual special needs plans (also called "dual" plans) are for people who get both Medicaid and Medicare. Dual plans cover doctor visits, hospital stays and prescription drugs. They offer more benefits and extras than Original Medicare. You'll keep all your Medicaid benefits too.

Medicaid Plans

Medicaid is health insurance for people with low incomes. You might be able to get Medicaid if you're pregnant, have children or live with a disability. In some cases, other adults also may qualify. Costs to you are low and based on your ability to pay. It's important to know that Medicaid rules and coverage differ from state to state.

Announcements

  • Heritage Health Open Enrollment starts Nov. 1 – Dec. 15. To learn more, visit Heritage Health Enrollment Center or call 1-888.255.2605
  • It’s your best shot. Schedule your flu shot today. There is no cost to you for flu shots. You can get one at your primary care provider’s (PCP) office or any clinic or pharmacy that accepts your plan. Visit myuhc.com/CommunityPlan to find a location near you.

Did you lose your job recently?

More people now qualify for Heritage Health and Heritage Health Adult Expansion (Medicaid). See if you can too. No copays for covered services.

  • The Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services is accepting applications for expansion-eligible Nebraskans. More information can be found here. Visit ACCESSNebraska.ne.gov for eligibility information. 

More information can be found here. Visit ACCESSNebraska.ne.gov for more information on eligibility.

  • Heritage Health Medicaid: Check with Medicaid and Long-Term Care for possible eligibility for coverage on the health insurance marketplace. Visit ACCESSNebraska.ne.gov or call 1-855-632-7633.

NEED A NEW PCP?

We can help you find a provider who is a good fit for you. Visit myuhc.com/CommunityPlan or call Member Services toll-free at 1-800-641-1902, TTY 711.

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Featured Programs


UnitedHealthcare - Heritage Health Adult Expansion Plan

The UnitedHealthcare Heritage Health Adult Expansion plan is a Medicaid plan for adults aged 19-64 with no dependent children who meet income and other eligibility requirements. Two tiers are offered: Basic and Prime.

Benefits include ambulatory services, emergency services, hospitalization, maternity and newborn care, mental health and substance use disorder services, prescription drugs, rehabilitative and habilitative services and devices, laboratory services, preventive, wellness and chronic disease management and other services such as long-term care, non-emergent transportation and durable medical equipment and more.


Health4Me™ Mobile App

This free mobile app allows you to access key information on the go. You can search for nearby doctors, view your member handbook or view your member ID card. 

The Health4Me mobile app can be downloaded to an Apple® or Android® smartphone or tablet.


Behavioral Health Services

Behavioral health is as important as physical health. That’s why we have coverage for both.

Required care is 100% covered with no co-pay, including testing and diagnosis, behavioral therapy and medication.

Behavioral health services can help you with personal problems that may affect you and/or your family. These problems may be stress, depression, anxiety or using drugs or alcohol. We can help. 


Transportation Assistance

Your coverage for transportation includes rides with National MedTrans for medical visits and other health related appointments.

National MedTrans provides dependable rides and excellent personal service. Your health care appointments are important, and they work to meet your unique transportation needs with 24/7 support.

Schedule non-urgent rides at least tthree business days before your appointment.

Urgent care and same-day rides are accepted.

Call to schedule rides at 1-833-583-5683 (TTY 1- 833-587-6527)

You can also learn more, schedule rides at www.natmedtrans.com/ne

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HealthTalk Member Newsletter

Our HealthTalk newsletter is now online. The newsletter (English or Español) is a great way to learn about our health plan and important health topics.

Now you can read it whenever, wherever you want. Check back quarterly for a new edition.


Healthy First Steps®

Build a healthy future for you and your baby, and earn great rewards. Our UnitedHealthcare Healthy First Steps® program helps keep you and your baby healthy during pregnancy and your baby’s first 15 months of life.

We will help you:

  • Choose a pregnancy provider and a pediatrician (child’s doctor).
  • Schedule visits and exams and arrange rides to your visits.
  • Earn rewards for going to visits throughout your pregnancy and baby’s first 15 months of life.
  • Get supplies, including breast pumps for nursing moms.
  • Connect with community resources such as Women, Infants and Children (WIC) services.

Health Education

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Healthy weight. Getting exercise.

Losing weight does not have to be hard. Getting more exercise is one of the best ways. Try to get 60 minutes or more of exercise every day. It doesn’t have to mean doing hard exercises or going to the gym every day. Just move your body. Here are some ideas:

Move! Dancing to your favorite tunes can help you burn more than 300 calories an hour. 

If you do play video games, play interactive ones where you have to move. You don’t even have to leave the house to move – try exercises like jumping jacks, marching in place, going up and down stairs, push-ups or sit-ups at home.

Walk! Take a walk with a friend outside. Walk your dog or your neighbor’s dog, or walk your cat! Instead of driving, walk or bike to school or a friend’s house.

Clean! Vacuum your room. Wash the car. Mow the lawn. Your parents will be happy, and it’s another chance for you to get more exercise, and maybe even have some fun.

Unplug! Limit your time watching TV or using your smartphone, computer or other device. Keep screen time to less than two hours a day. When you do watch TV or use your phone – try marching in place or exercising while you watch/play.


How stress affects you

When you're stressed, your body knows it. Your heart starts pounding and your muscles tense. Everyone has stress in their life now and then. But chronic stress can have negative effects on both your physical and your mental health. 

It can affect:
Digestion. Stress slows the release of stomach acid and causes the colon to work faster. This can result in stomachaches or diarrhea.

Heart rate and blood vessels. Your heart rate, blood pressure and cholesterol may increase. This raises your risk for
heart attacks and strokes.

Immune system. Stress makes wounds heal slower. You’re also more likely to get colds and infections.

Weight. Stress makes you crave fats and carbohydrates. If you gain weight in your abdominal area, you’re at greater
risk for heart disease and diabetes.

Mental health. Stress makes you tense and anxious. This can lead to depression, headaches or other problems such as trouble sleeping.

Regain your balance. If stress has taken over your life, here are some ideas to regain control:

Make time for regular exercise. Check with your doctor to see what types of exercise are right for you.

  • Do things you enjoy.
  • Learn how to relax. 
  • Treat yourself well.

If your stress is still an issue, talk with your doctor. He or she can recommend someone who can help you find other ways to manage your stress.

Find out more online at liveandworkwell.com


Depression

Depression is a real illness. It can be treated.

You can feel like yourself again. Depression is an illness like diabetes or heart disease. The first step is to accept that you need help. The second step is to talk to your doctor.

Common signs of depression can include:

• Feeling unhappy, down or sad every day or feeling worthless, guilty, helpless or hopeless. 
• Loss of interest in hobbies, activities and people you once enjoyed.
• Trouble sleeping or sleeping more than usual, or feeling tired, weak or low in energy.
• Loss of appetite or eating too much.
• Having trouble concentrating, remembering or making decisions.
• Thinking or talking about suicide.

Find out more online at liveandworkwell.com.

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Healthy weight. Healthy eating.

Healthy Weight. Healthy You.

When you eat more calories than you use, your body stores the extra calories as fat. A few extra pounds are not bad for most people, but too many extra pounds and too much body fat can be bad for your health.* Doctors call this being “overweight” or “obese.”

Doctors use a measurement called body mass index (BMI), using your height and your weight to determine how much body fat you have. The best way to stay at a healthy weight or to lose weight is to make good food choices. Here are some easy ways to do that every day:

  • Try to eat more vegetables and fruit than any other type of food whenever possible.
  • Choose low-calorie foods or smaller portions when eating out.
  • Pick healthy side dishes like apple slices or apple sauce instead of Ffrench fries. If you are really craving fries, try eating something healthy like a salad, apple slices or apple sauce first, then split a small portion of fries with a few other people.
  • Drink water or milk instead of soda.
  • Check the label – can you recognize all of the ingredients? If not, it might have a lot of extra stuff you don’t need, so look for other options. Try nuts or whole grain crackers instead of chips.
  • Try replacing sugary snacks with things like yogurt or dried fruit (without added sugar). If you have a sweet tooth, try a small portion of your favorite sweet only once a day.